Victory at Sea, Full Fathom Five

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U.S. submarines, 1941–1945 In this episode of Victory at Sea, viewers see how the U.S. Navy’s submarines contributed to the Japanese empire’s defeat, sinking thousands of tons of commercial ships. Viewers see footage of ship upon ship destroyed. But a price is paid for those whom the U.S. Navy classifies as “did not return”.
22. April 5, 1953 “The Fate of Europe” Black Sea, south of France, surrender Sevastopol was liberated and the Allies finally defeat Germany. Viewers also witness the meeting of Roosevelt, Churchill and Stalin for final plans for Germany’s surrender and the forming of the United Nations. At the end, Hitler commits suicide, and Nazi flags are torn apart and German military uniforms and hats lie on the ground, discarded. However, compelling footage of German cities in ruins make this one of the most somber episodes of Victory at Sea.

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Victory at Sea is a documentary television series about naval warfare during World War II that was originally broadcast by NBC in the USA in 1952–1953. It was condensed into a film in 1954. Excerpts from the music soundtrack, by Richard Rodgers and Robert Russell Bennett, were re-recorded and sold as record albums. The original TV broadcasts comprised 26 half-hour segments—Sunday afternoons at 3pm (EST) in most markets—starting October 26, 1952 and ending May 3, 1953. The series, which won an Emmy award in 1954 as “best public affairs program”, played an important part in establishing historic documentaries as a viable television genre